Op-Eds

Op-Eds

Amitav Acharya, "Asian Secruity Outlook"

A selection of blogs on "Conflict, Cooperation, and Transformation in a Rising Asia".

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Amitav Acharya, "Future World Affairs," Blogspot

A selection of op-eds, lectures and reflections on actors, events and trends that will shape the future of Asia and the world.

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Amitav Acharya, "SA must use its global, regional influence wisely," Daily Dispatch, (May 31, 2012)

"BY most accounts, South Africa is an "emerging power", at least based on its membership in forums such as the G-20, the IBSA (India, Brazil, South Africa), and now the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa). Yet, how can it best contribute to the evolving framework of global governance?"

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Amitav Acharya, "ASEAN's Dilemma: Courting Washington Without Hurting Beijing," Asian Pacific Bullentin, (October 18, 2011)

As the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) prepares to host the East Asia Summit in Bali this November, attention will be focused on the two central powers: China and the United States. Amitav Arharya, Professor of International Relations at the School of International Service, American University, cautions that ASEAN has to be careful in how it deals with both the United States and China.

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Amitav Acharya, "Overturning Lee Kuan Yew's Legacy in Singapore," Foreign Affairs, (September 28, 2011)

"Lee Kuan Yew, Singapore's storied first prime minister, gave his countrymen two things that elude most developing nations: stability and prosperity. Now, a new generation of Singaporeans with little recollection of Lee's crusade against poverty and violence wants democracy as well. In pursuing greater political openness in two elections this year, they are challenging one of Lee's most deeply ingrained beliefs: that development and stability do not necessarily go hand in hand with democracy."

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Amitav Acharya, "Times of India: The Cairo Connection," Council on Foreign Relations, (Febraury 21, 2011).

Many people wonder if the crisis in Egypt, leading to Hosni Mubarak's resignation on February 11, might spur similar popular upheaval for regime change in Asia. Asia has no shortage of potential candidates, including the biggest of them all: China. Then there are also Vietnam, Burma and North Korea.

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Amitav Acharya, "Will ASEAN thrive in 2030?" The Jakarta Post, (February 14, 2011).

What will the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) look like in the year 2030? As a durable and successful regional grouping in the developing world, ASEAN is a force for stability and cooperation in Asia. But can we take its longevity and success for granted?

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Amitav Acharya, "Canada’s role in the Asia Pacific region" Tronton Star, (November 17, 2011)
Canada's involvement with Asian multilateralism has been up to this point minimal when compared to its G20 counterparts.  While Canadian policy differs considerably from the US both countries have a shared interest in mitigating Chinese aggression.

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David Bosco, "The Multilateralist," Foreign Policy.

We bring here the Multilateralist column by David Bosco, an Assistant Professor at School of International Service, American University and a Faculty Fellow of TRANSCEND. The column is dedicated to analysing the latest trends in global governance.

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David Capie and Amitav Acharya "The United States and the East Asia Summit: A New Beginning?" PacNet, No. 64 (November 14, 2011) 
American policy has appeared to take a turn with the appearance of President Obama for the first time at the EAS meeting in Bali.  The United States presence at the EAS meeting is important for three reasons.  Firstly this is be the first time that all of Asia's major players be meet at the same summit-level regional grouping, secondly this move represents a reversal of the Bush policy on participation with EAS, and finally this move comes at a time when China's view of multilateralism is turning negative. 

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Ramesh Thakur, "UN Breathes Life into‘Responsibility to Protect’," Toronto Star, (March 22, 2011).

On March 17, Security Council Resolution 1973 authorized the use of “all necessary measures” short of an invasion and occupation of Libya “to protect civilians and civilian-populated areas” — the first UN-sanctioned combat operations since the 1991 Gulf War.

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SIGUR Center 
Policy Brief 
 
The SIGUR center's policy breif looks at the changes in Burma/Mynmar in politcal and economic reform and the role that the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) has played.